Transference and countertransference

A modern, social-cognitive perspective on transference explains how it can occur in everyday life. Essentials of Psychiatric Nursing,14th ed. In The Psychology of the Transference, Carl Jung states that within the transference dyad both participants typically experience a variety of opposites, that in love and in psychological growth, the key to success is the ability to endure the tension of the opposites without abandoning the process, and that this tension allows one to grow and to transform.

What Do Transference and Counter Transference Mean?

It is important to mention that in some cases transference is positive, positive in the sense that the transferred feelings and attitudes toward the nurse result from past fulfilling experiences and relationships.

Occurrence[ edit ] It is common for people Transference and countertransference transfer feelings from their parents to their partners or children that is, cross-generational entanglements.

For instance, one could mistrust somebody who resembles an ex-spouse in manners, voice, or external appearance, or be overly compliant to someone who resembles a childhood friend.

The patient may be uncomfortable in expressing these feelings in such a negative manner, and the nurse will usually dislike being the object of such expression.

For example, you might not be aware that you have allowed your boundaries to slip — say in relation to how much time you offer one client over and above that which you would normally see as being part of a coaching contract.

For example, a patient who displays childlike dependency toward a nurse may evoke a parental attitude from that nurse, depending on the meaning that he or she assigns to the relationship with the patient, and if past conflicts are significant to the present situation.

Melanie Klein disapproved on the grounds that poorly analyzed psycho-analysts could excuse their own emotional difficulties" thereby; but among her younger followers "the trend within the Kleinian group was to take seriously the new view of counter-transference" [18] — Hanna Segal warning in typically pragmatic fashion however that "Countertransference can be the best of servants but is the most awful of masters".

In essence, this describes the transference of the treater to the patient, which is referred to as the "narrow perspective".

What is Countertransference?

The phenomena also can affect the entire therapeutic environment if not managed properly, as the rest of the therapeutic community of patients and staff may perceive the relationship in a positive or negative manner.

Rather than using the patient's transference strategically in therapy, the positive or negative transference is diplomatically pointed out and explained as an obstacle to cooperation and improvement.

Addressing Countertransference Once countertransference is recognized, it is important that the therapist acknowledge and work through those feelings.

Thus, discomfort arises in both parties. Once again, the relationship usually should not be terminated in the presence of countertransference. How countertransference is used in therapy can make it either helpful or problematic.

countertransference

Imagine that you meet someone while grocery shopping who reminds you of a beloved aunt. Transference is seen as being a general phenomena and for those who believe in its existence is one that is acted out by everyone and often contributes to the decisions we make about those we chose as friends and partners as well as towards those we may not like without that person doing anything other being him or herself.

There is always a level of transference and counter transference, as therapy is a relationship, us as therapists have a vested interest in our role and want to provide a valuable intervention, we care.

What is Countertransference?

The patient may assign inappropriate meanings to their relationship with a group of nurses, or the entire unit staff. Such a client may be wonderful to work with because they have made a positive transference of these qualities on to you. But what he learned was that the analysis of the transference was actually the work that needed to be done.

Importantly, a staff member who is helped to identify their own countertransference in dealing with a particular patient might be able to recognize and manage this on their own when they encounter other patients later on who evoke similiar personal reactions.

In cases of transference, the relationship does not usually need to be terminated e. In psychoanalysis and other forms of psychodynamic therapy, transference most often refers to the displacement of feelings towards parents or siblings, etc. It is important for the therapist to understand the role that of transference and countertransference, and deal with those emotions in such a way that the core of the counseling relationship is not shattered by these feelings.

Likewise, some counter transference can be predicted sometimes from our own histories. A positive transference is one where the client experienced positive feelings towards an individual based on the person in their past and a negative transference is just the opposite. Furthermore, this discussion will highlight nursing interventions in these situations, in order to provide insight into how nurses can maintain and improve the therapeutic focus and environment.

The more similar in personality a male physician was to his father, the more likely and intense was the transference. Also, one individual alone may not always be the object of transference. By doing this you can then go on to consider how such concepts are affecting your work with the client and what, if anything, you need to do to ensure a healthy and productive relationship is maintained between you and your client.

It is irrelevant whether that individual has power or not, as it is all about unconscious processes and perceptions the client has. The goal is to guide the patient to independence by teaching them to assume responsibility for their own behaviors, feelings, and thoughts, and to assign the correct meanings to relationships based on present circumstances instead of the past.

Countertransference, which occurs when a therapist transfers emotions to a person in therapy, is often a reaction to transference, a phenomenon in which the person in treatment redirects feelings. Transference and countertransference: In a therapy context, transference refers to redirection of a client's feelings from a significant person to a therapist.

Transference is often manifested as an erotic attraction towards a therapist, but can be seen in many other forms such as rage, hatred, mistrust, parentification, extreme dependence, or. Transference and countertransference describe two commonly occurring scenarios within a counseling relationship.

Both transference and countertransference represent the manner in which the client acts and feels toward the therapist and vice versa. Transference and countertransference: In a therapy context, transference refers to redirection of a client's feelings from a significant person to a therapist.

Transference and countertransference describe two commonly occurring scenarios within a counseling relationship. Both transference and countertransference represent the manner in which the client acts and feels toward the therapist and vice versa.

Transference

TRANSFERENCE AND COUNTERTRANSFERENCE C. H. PATTERSON (Chapter 9 inCounseling and Psychotherapy: Theory and janettravellmd.com York: Harper & Row, ) As rapport is an overworked word with counselors, so is transference among psychotherapists.

Transference and countertransference
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Countertransference - Wikipedia